February 23, 2019

Pakistan Army and ISI retired generals gave away sensitive nuclear weapon information to hostile intelligence agency


The Pakistan Army officers are named Lt. General Javed Iqbal Awan(R) and ISI Brigadier Raja Rizwan Ali Haider(R)

https://tribune.com.pk/story/1916404/1-two-senior-servicemen-held-espionage-face-court-martial-dg-ispr/

ISI Brigadier Raja Rizwan Ali Haider(R) kidnapped by ISI henchmen from Islamabad sector G-10, street-17

https://www.dawn.com/news/1440673
ISI Brigadier Raja Rizwan Ali Haider(R)
Lt. General Javed Iqbal Awan(R)

Lt. General Javed Iqbal Awan(R)

Lieutenant General Javed Iqbal Awan is from Chakwal and son of a Major and his elder brother retired as a colonel.|Gen Javed Iqbal Awan started his education from Military College Sarai Alamgir Jhelum where he was a average to just pass class student.

He joined Pakistan Army and passed out with merit and joined 9 Battalion of Frontier Force Regiment.He always held highest andn top most appointments due to his outstanding networking and links and remained as instructor In Pakistan Military Academy, Command n Staff College and then remained as 111 brigade commander as a Brigadier. As a Major General ,He commanded infantry division at Bahawalpur, Infantry division at Jhelum and then remained as Director General Military Operations at GHQ. As Lieutenant General he remained as Adjutant General Pakistan Army n then commanded corps at Bhawalpur. At the same time he remained as colonel Commandant of Frontier Force Regiment which is also an Honour.

Lt. GENERAL JAVID IQBAL AWAN recently got retired from Pakistan Army in May 2015.He was  settled in Rawalpindi and got arrested by the counter intelligence wing on the ISI in Aug-Oct 2018 timeframe for leaking secret information to a hostile foreign intelligence agency. He came into knowledge of official secrets during his tenure as Pakistan Director General Military Operations



Saab to Update Australian Army C-RAM Capability





In late December, Saab received an order from the Capability Acquisition Sustainment Group (CASG) on behalf of the Australian Army to update the Wireless Audio Visual Emergency System (WAVES) equipment for the Counter Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (C-RAM) System. The WAVES equipment provides early warning audible and visual alerts when the C-RAM sensors detect and identify an incoming threat within an exclusion zone.

The C-RAM capability (which comprises of multiple sensors, C2 nodes and warning systems) is an essential capability to protect friendly forces from hostile fire by detecting and warning against small, mobile and hard-to-find threats such as rockets, artillery and mortar fire. The Commonwealth’s C-RAM solution is built around the Saab Giraffe Agile Multi-Beam (AMB) radar which is part of a family of ground-based radars that can detect a range of incoming threats, from mortar and artillery rounds and rockets to small drones and fast moving aircraft.

“This is further proof of Saab’s strong position as a C-RAM worldwide supplier With the Giraffe AMB as the surface radar system of choice for a number of customers worldwide, including Australia, United Kingdom, Sweden and France”, says Anders Carp, head of Saab AB’s business area Surveillance.

Saab Australia provides the In-Service Support for the Australian Defence Force C-RAM system.

“This contract ensures that the Australian Army can continue to deploy world-leading technology to help protect Australian bases and personnel”, said Andy Keough, Managing Director of Saab Australia, "The contract also demonstrates Saab’s strong commitment to build and maintain in-country support capabilities.”

Headquartered in Adelaide, Saab Australia is a wholly owned subsidiary of Saab AB, providing Defence, Security and Traffic Management solutions. With over 500 experienced staff across Australia and New Zealand, and a reputation for achieving complex systems integration projects on time, Saab Australia has proven its capabilities over more than 30 years.

German Documents Reveal Singapore Received More Leopard 2 Tanks





 Information from government documents about a delivery of German Leopard 2 tanks to Singapore in 2017 suggest the city-state bought a new batch of tanks for its Army.

According to the register of conventional arms exports released by the German Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, Singapore received 18 Leopard 2 main battle tanks in 2017, adding to the seven tanks the German government said it exported in 2016.

The additional delivery in 2017 brings the total number of tanks received by Singapore to more than 170.

It’s unknown how many tanks were ordered or what variant of was delivered. It is also unknown if this latest batch of tanks are brand new or refurbished secondhand vehicles, although the former is unlikely given production of the Leopard 2A4 has ended.

German media reports say the manufacturer Krauss-Maffei Wegmann was building Leopard 2A7s for Singapore and Qatar.

Germany previously declared it exported 161 Leopard 2 tanks to Singapore between 2007 and 2012 in its reports to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms database. Singapore declared the receipt of 156 Leopard 2A4s during the same period.

The 2017 delivery forms part of the $93 million worth of conventional arms exported to Singapore from Germany that year, which also included recovery vehicles, parts for tanks, various military vehicles, training and in-flight refueling aircraft, and small arms.

When contacted for comment regarding the 2017 deliveries, the ministry told Defense News to refer to its earlier statement. It had previously said that “no other variants of the Leopard has (sic) been acquired” since Singapore announced it had acquired refurbished Leopard 2A4s from Germany in 2006. Singapore announced at the time that it had acquired 96 tanks, with 66 to be refurbished and put into service, with the remaining 30 to serve as spares.

However, the statement does not deny Singapore increased the number of Leopard 2A4s in its possession. KMW declined to comment about the transfer when asked by Defense News.

The Singapore Army has one active battalion of Leopard 2s, with additional vehicles assigned to training units in Singapore and Germany, where it uses Oberlausitz Military Training Area. Even accounting for those being used as a source for spares, the number acquired so far suggests Singapore has enough vehicles to equip a number of reserve units.

Singapore’s Leopard 2s are also being upgraded to the Leopard 2SG standard with the addition of an IBD Deisenroth Advanced Modular Armor Protection modular composite armor package, El-Op Commander Open Architecture Panoramic Sight and other improvements. Singapore also reportedly acquired Rheinmetall’s ADS active protection system for its Leopard 2 tanks.

First Thai Navy Joint Training between HTMS Chakri Naruebet and HTMS Bhumibol Adulyadej





The first joint training image in the Gulf of Thailand between helicopters carrier Chakri Naruebet Royal Ship (911) and Bhumibol Adulyadej Royal Boat (471), a new high-performance frigate ship under the Frigate Fleet No. 1 Battle Squadron of the Thai Navy.
14 Feb 2019 at 08:00 - 13:00 hrs., Lt. Bhumibol Adulyadej, trained to receive and deliver fuel in the sea with HMS Chakri Naruebet.

Images of HMS Bhumibol Adulyadej and HMS Chakri Naruebet taken from the air in the training of both ships.

New Simulator to Keep Australian Navy Communicators at the Cutting Edge




Royal Australian Navy trainees utilise the newly built Communications Centre Simulator at the Defence Force School of Signals - Maritime Wing at HMAS Cerberus (photo : RAN)

A new simulator at the Defence Force School of Signals Maritime Wing at HMAS Cerberus will ensure Navy’s newest Communications and Information Systems sailors join their first ships fully prepared for the rigours of operating at sea.

The learning system simulator was developed by Cirrus Real Time Processing Systems, an Australian owned and operated small to medium enterprise. The successful delivery of this system is a demonstration of the capability within Australia to develop and engineer complex simulation technology to support the ADF.

Minister for Defence, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP said the simulator would significantly enhance the Royal Australian Navy’s ability to conduct complex operations.

“The Australian Defence Force is required to operate simultaneously in both domestic and foreign domains, including cyber and space while coordinating people and assets to achieve strategic aims, requiring world best practice in communications,” Minister Pyne said.

“This simulator is another innovative step forward for our Navy, providing our highly capable sailors with the training tools they need to succeed in their mission of preserving peace and security for all Australians.”

The simulator is based on a generic communication centre in an enhanced frigate and is designed to mimic the operational environment at sea, using scenarios that may be encountered by communicators embarked in Major Fleet Units.

Minister Pyne said the simulator would greatly enhance Navy’s capabilities across a range of dynamic maritime operations.

“Communicators are critical to the success of our Fleet as we operate in an increasingly dynamic maritime domain, regularly in task groups with ships, aircraft and troops on the ground,” Minister Pyne said.

The simulator will support training and assessment for basic communications operator courses through to advanced courses. It will be used for the first time during a pilot course due to be conducted in mid-2019.

Singapore’s ST Engineering Launches SRAMS 120 mm Mk II





Singapore's ST Engineering Land Systems has completed the development and testing of new version of its 120 mm Super Rapid Advanced Mortar System (SRAMS), called the Mk II, and new ammunition for it.

The original 120 mm SRAMS featured hydraulic elevation and traverse, but the latest SRAMS Mk II has all-electric elevation and traverse with the latter increased to 180 o left and right, according to James Soon of ST Engineering Land Systems. This is laid onto the target using a computerised fire control system (FCS) by the operator, via a flat panel display and associated controls. It can fire 10 rounds a minute.

The latest suite of ST Engineering 120 mm ammunition includes the PM120 precision guided mortar bomb (PG MB), Extended Range High Explosive (ER HE), ER Infra-Red Red Phosphorous (IR RP) and ER Illuminating. These are all designed for use with smoothbore mortar systems.

The 120 mm PM120 is GPS guided and the company quoted a maximum range of up to 8.5 km and a circular error probable (CEP) of 10 m. The HE warhead contains 2.8 kg of TNT. ER HE also contains 2.8 kg of TNT but this can be insensitive munition (IM) compliant if requested by the customer and is fitted with a DM111A4/A5 nose mounted fuze. Maximum muzzle velocity was being quoted as 408 m/s and maximum range of up to 9 km.

The ER RP contains three smoke canisters and is fitted with a MTSQ DM93 fuze, with a maximum muzzle velocity of 408 m/s and a maximum range of up to 9 km, ST Engineering said. The ER illuminating round has the same fuze, muzzle velocity, and range as the ER RP and has an illuminating intensity of 1.25 million cd. There is also the option of IR Illuminating.



French carrier task force to participate in joint exercise with JMSDF in Pacific


The French Navy has decided to send its sole aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle to the Pacific Ocean from March.





TAI gets contract to develop heavy attack helicopter


Presidency of Defence Industries, Turkey has given TAI a contract to develop an indigenous heavy attack helicopter.





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